Middle School/IB Curriculum

unspecified-7St. James Academy’s International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) lays the foundation for a student’s success in the middle school as well as at the highest academic high school and college levels by creating internationally minded citizens of the World.

The International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) was founded in Geneva Switzerland in 1968 as a nonprofit universal approach to education. IB promotes intercultural understanding and respect, not as an alternative to a sense of cultural and national identity, but as an essential part of life in the 21st century. IB Programmes encourage international-mindedness in students and educators using the IB Learner Profile as a compass (balanced, caring, communicator, inquirer, knowledgeable, open-minded, principled, reflective, risk taker, and thinker).

IBPosterSimilar in academic rigor to an Advanced Placement (AP) program, the IB differs by utilizing a global approach, fostering independence, critical thinking, creativity, service, and compassionate citizenship. At the high school level, IB students target a level of academic achievement that facilitates the college application process. For example, the 2010 US News and World Report ranking of best high schools used equally data from AP and IB programs in their methodology. IB students routinely gain admission to many of the best universities!

The goal of the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) is to “develop internationally-minded people who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.” St. James Academy (SJA) contributes to this goal by teaching students respect for human life and dignity, ethical judgment, and global citizenship. Additionally, SJA strengthens IB learners by developing all 10 Learner Profile characteristics and encouraging students to be: thinker, risk-taker, inquirer, caring, knowledgeable, principled, communicator, open minded, reflective, and balanced citizens of the world. Developing the IB MYP five Areas of Interaction (Approaches to Learning, Human Ingenuity, Community and Service, Environments, and Health and Social Education) is demonstrated throughout our Middle School Course Descriptors as we continue to grow and nurture future leaders in 21st Century thinking with international mindedness.

IB Mission Statement:

The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.

To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.

These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

Advanced Pre-Algebra (7-2) Year 2

Course Description

Textbook: Pre-Algebra. Glencoe McGraw Hill, 2008 and ALEKS – online course

Overview: This Year 2 Advanced Pre-Algebra course includes topics in number patterns, orders of operation, algebraic expressions and linear equations. Students develop knowledge in the modeling of integers, solving multi-step equations, and problem solving. The course allows students to explore number theory including factoring, exponents, and scientific notation. Students explore rational numbers, and the relationship between fractions, decimals, and percentages. Additionally, students investigate proportions, dimensional analysis, and calculating percent increase and decrease. Students also study geometric relationships and measurement.

Topics Covered: Problem solving; variables and equations; ordered pairs; integers; solving equations; factors and fractions; rational numbers; linear equations; inequalities; functions; graphing; real numbers; right triangles; two and three dimensional figures; and statistics.

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, reflection written and oral, educational games, exit tickets

Summative Assessment:
Unit Tests, trimester tests, pattern investigation, real-life problem solving

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s:
Communication, social, self management, thinking

Global Context:
Identities and relationships, orientation in space and time

Key Concepts:
Form, logic, relationships

Mathematics, MYP Year 2, aims and objectives:
The aims of MYP mathematics are to encourage and enable students to:

  • enjoy mathematics, develop curiosity and begin to appreciate its elegance and power;
  • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics;
  • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts;
  • develop logical, critical and creative thinking;
  • develop confidence, perseverance, and independence in mathematical thinking and problem-solving;
  • develop powers of generalization and abstraction;
  • apply and transfer skills to a wide range of real-life situations, other areas of knowledge and future developments;
  • appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other;
  • appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the work of mathematicians and the applications of mathematics;
  • appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives;
  • appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other areas of knowledge;
  • develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to pursue further studies in mathematics;
  • develop the ability to reflect critically upon their own work and the work of others.

The objectives of MYP mathematics are:

  • A: Knowledge and understanding
  • B: Investigating patterns
  • C: Communicating
  • D: Applying mathematics in real-life context

Prior to 2014:

Human Ingenuity: Exploring the application of mathematical knowledge

Environments: Population growth / resources

Community & Service: Apply different forms of representation (graphs, tables, and diagrams) to communicate facts and figures to the school community

Health & Social Education: Informed, responsible choices, and positive attitudes lead to balanced and healthy lives for themselves and other members of their community

Algebra I (7-1) Year 2

Course Description

Textbook: Algebra I Concepts and Skills Volume 1 and 2, McDougal Littel & ALEKS Online Course

Overview:
This Year 2 Algebra I course is a study of both linear and non-linear functions. Students examine patterns to create generalizations and models to represent real-world scenarios. The concepts of equivalence, quantities, and systems are emphasized.

Topics Covered:
Connections to Algebra (evaluating algebraic expressions, order of operations, verbal and algebraic models, distributive property); integers; functions; solving linear equations; graphing linear equations; writing linear equations; linear inequalities; systems of equations/inequalities (simultaneous equations); multiplication properties of exponents; quadratic equations and square roots; solving quadratic equations by various methods; polynomials; factoring; rational expressions

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, reflection written and/or oral, math journaling

Summative Assessment:
Unit Tests, trimester tests and final exams, MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Knowledge acquisition, critical thinking skills, communication skills, collaborative skills note taking, recognizing concepts and applying skills, using a calculator, using appropriate technology skills, developing and applying problem-solving strategies, approximating data, diagramming, organizing data

Global Contexts:
Identities and relationships, personal and cultural expression, orientation in time and space, scientific and technical innovation, globalization and sustainability, fairness and development

Key Concepts:
Form, relationships, logic

IB Aims:
The aims of MYP mathematics are to encourage and enable students to:

  • enjoy mathematics, develop curiosity and begin to appreciate its elegance and power;
  • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics;
  • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts;
  • develop logical, critical and creative thinking;
  • develop confidence, perseverance, and independence in mathematical thinking and problem-solving;
  • develop powers of generalization and abstraction;
  • apply and transfer skills to a wide range of real-life situations, other areas of knowledge and future developments;
  • appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other;
  • appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the work of mathematicians and the applications of mathematics;
  • appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives;
  • appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other areas of knowledge;
  • develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to pursue further studies in mathematics;
  • develop the ability to reflect critically upon their own work and the work of others.

IB Objectives
Knowing and Understanding, investigating patterns, communicating, applying mathematics in real-world contexts

Prior to 2014:

Human Ingenuity: Exploring the application of mathematical knowledge

Environments: Resources are limited

Community & Service: Apply different forms of representation (graphs, tables, and diagrams) to communicate facts and figures to the school community

Health & Social Education: Informed, responsible choices, and positive attitudes lead to balanced and healthy lives for themselves and other members of their community

Algebra I (8-2) Year 3

Course Description

Textbook: Algebra I Concepts and Skills Volume 1 and 2, McDougal Littel & ALEKS Online Course

Overview:
This Year 3 Algebra I course is a study of both linear and non-linear functions. Students examine patterns to create generalizations and models to represent real-world scenarios. The concepts of equivalence, quantities, and systems are emphasized.

Topics Covered:
Connections to Algebra (Evaluating Algebraic Expressions, order of operations, verbal and algebraic models, distributive property); integers; functions; solving linear equations; graphing linear equations; writing linear equations; linear inequalities; systems of equations/inequalities (simultaneous equations); multiplication properties of exponents; quadratic equations and square roots; solving quadratic equations by various methods; polynomials; factoring; rational expressions

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, reflection written and/or oral, math journaling

Summative Assessment:
Unit Tests, trimester tests and final exams, MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Knowledge acquisition, critical thinking skills, communication skills, collaborative skills note taking, recognizing concepts and applying skills, using a calculator, using appropriate technology skills, developing and applying problem-solving strategies, approximating data, diagramming, organizing data

Global Contexts:
Identities and relationships, personal and cultural expression, orientation in time and space, scientific and technical innovation, globalization and sustainability, fairness and development

Key Concepts:
Form, relationships, logic

IB Aims:
The aims of MYP mathematics are to encourage and enable students to:

  • enjoy mathematics, develop curiosity and begin to appreciate its elegance and power;
  • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics;
  • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts;
  • develop logical, critical and creative thinking;
  • develop confidence, perseverance, and independence in mathematical thinking and problem-solving;
  • develop powers of generalization and abstraction;
  • apply and transfer skills to a wide range of real-life situations, other areas of knowledge and future developments;
  • appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other;
  • appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the work of mathematicians and the applications of mathematics;
  • appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives;
  • appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other areas of knowledge;
  • develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to pursue further studies in mathematics;
  • develop the ability to reflect critically upon their own work and the work of others.

IB Objectives
Knowing and understanding, investigating patterns, communicating, applying mathematics in real-world contexts

Prior to 2014:

Human Ingenuity: Exploring the application of mathematical knowledge

Environments: Students explore proportional growth of population and materials to determine sustainability

Community & Service: Apply different forms of representation (graphs, tables, and diagrams) to communicate facts and figures to the school community

Health & Social Education: Informed, responsible choices, and positive attitudes lead to balanced and healthy lives for themselves and other members of their community

Visual Art Year 1

Course Description

Overview:
In this Year 1 Visual Arts course students explore ancient civilizations, materials, and symbols through historical art produced by these civilizations. They continue the use and manipulation of symbols in creating designs in mediums of clay, paper, found objects, mosaics, and drawing. Students become thinkers and inquirers as they explore these civilizations throughout our integrated curriculum with Year 1 Humanities.

Topics Covered:
Egyptian artifacts, mythical comic strips, world flags, drawing values, mosaics, book making, greek vases

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, peer review, reflections written and/or oral, skill development, art journal

Summative Assessment:
Teacher and peer review, MYP projects

Global Context:
Personal and cultural expression, orientation in time and space

Key Concepts:
Aesthetics, identity, change, and communication

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Knowledge acquisition, creative discovery, artistic skills and mindfulness

IB MYP Year 1 Aims and Objectives:

At the end of the first year, students should be able to:

  • demonstrate an awareness of the art form studied in relation to some of the contexts that influence their current work;
  • learn skills and develop the techniques and processes needed to create, perform and/or present art, with the teacher’s guidance;
  • describe the progress they have made so far and identify areas that have been particularly easy or challenging;
  • recognize that art practices and artworks vary from culture to culture.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: World flags: Symbols and Meanings

Human Ingenuity: Organization supports creativity

Environments: Art affects environments

Health & Social Education: Art is relaxing for health and wellness

Visual Art Year 2

Course Description

Overview:
In this Year 2 Visual Arts course students explore the art of various cultures and religions as we integrate with Humanities and Faith Development. They utilize these sources to inspire their own designs in: glass, clay, printmaking, drawing, and painting. Students become caring and balanced in their art explorations as we grow in international mindedness.

Topics Covered:
Islamic art, printmaking; Chinese masks (ceramics); Stained glass decorative arts; 3-D art forms

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, peer review, reflections written and/or oral, skill development; art journal

Summative Assessment:
Teacher and peer review, MYP projects

Global Context: Personal and cultural expression, orientation in time and place, identities and relationships

Key Concepts: Aesthetics, identity, change, communication,

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Knowledge acquisition, creative discovery, artistic skills and mindfulness

IB MYP Year 2 Aims and Objectives:
At the end of the first year, students should be able to:

  • develop an awareness of the art form studied in relation to some of the contexts that influence their current work;
  • use skills, techniques, and processes needed to create, perform and/or present art, with the teacher’s guidance;
  • continue to develop the progress they have made and identify areas that have been particularly easy or challenging;
  • understand that art practices and artworks vary from culture to culture.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Kiva Micro-loans; Service rocks

Human Ingenuity: Culture and religion influence artistic expression

Environments: Art changes environments

Health & Social Education: Art can be a means to improve the lives of others

Earth Science Year 2

Course Description

Textbook: Interactive Science: Science and Technology. Pearson Education, Inc. 2011; Interactive Science:Water and Atmosphere. Pearson Education, Inc. 2011; Interactive Science:Earth’s Surface. Pearson Education, Inc. 2011; Interactive Science:Earth’s Structure. Pearson Education, Inc. 2011

Additional Resource: Science Explorer- Earth Science

Overview:
The Science curriculum at St. James Academy is delivered using a multi-sensory approach, including technology, experimentation, and lecture. Students work in cooperative groups to model real life science experiences that are both activity and inquiry based to solve problems, promote interaction, and develop collaborative skills. Students explore the relationship between science and technology and the effect of both on our society. Technology software is utilized at all levels to facilitate project-based learning. By encouraging exploration and open-ended investigation, students develop research skills, problem-solving, critical thinking, and decision-making, while demonstrating knowledge acquisition of topics covered. Integration of the IB MYP philosophy enhances global awareness, community, caring, environmental responsibility, and encourages a belief in the relevance of scientific study to daily life.

Topics Covered:
Scientific method, hydrosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere, science fair, addiction

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, weekly quizzes, reflections, drills, exit tickets, experiments/Lab reports

Summative Assessment:
Unit tests, mid-term and final exams, MYP Projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Note taking, knowledge acquisition skills, application of knowledge, analyzing skills, observation skills, communication skills, integrating and summarizing skills, scientific inquiry skills, hypothesizing, evaluation skills, integrity, responsibility, and reflection

Global Context:
Scientific and technical innovation, globalization and sustainability

IB MYP Year 2 AIMS and Objectives:

  • demonstrate understanding of basic scientific language by using appropriate scientific terminology, units of measurement and symbolic representation;
  • provide scientific information using appropriate modes of communication;
  • work effectively as members of a team, by being guided into collaborating, acknowledging, and supporting others as well as ensuring a safe working environment;
  • develop inquiring minds and curiosity about science and the natural world;
  • formulate a hypothesis and explain it using logical scientific reasoning;
  • design scientific investigations that include variables and controls, material/equipment needed, a method to be followed, data to be collected, and suggestions for its analysis;
  • analyze and interpret data by identifying trends, patterns, and relationships;
  • appreciate the benefits and limitations of science and its application in technological developments;
  • draw conclusions supported by scientific explanations and a reasoned interpretation of the analysis of the data.

Prior to 2014:

Community and Service: Investigating scientific issues and their impact on the local community and/or global society, as well as reflecting on the topics studied

Human Ingenuity: Appreciate the nature of scientific inquiry and real life scientific endeavor

Environments: One World, Our Earth; Exploring how human activity and exploitation of natural resources play a role in the sustainability of the natural capital

Health and Social Education: Examine conditions and effects of life on Earth

Visual Art Year 3

Course Description

Overview:
In this Year 3 Visual Arts course student projects and digital projects will challenge them to become knowledgeable, communicators, and risk takers. They will utilize and build on acquired technical and creative skills and apply them to contemporary medium in response to more complex questions.

Topics Covered:
Villainous cards (drawing); Fish Out of Water (ceramics); grid drawing; digital photography; improvisational painting

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, peer review, reflections written and/or oral, skill development, art journal

Summative Assessment:
Teacher and peer review, MYP projects

Global Context:
Identities and relationships, orientation in time and space, personal and cultural expression

Key Concepts:
Aesthetics, identity, change, communication

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Knowledge acquisition, creative discovery, artistic skills and mindfulness

IB MYP Year 3 Aims and Objectives:
At the end of the Year 3, students should be able to:
understand knowledge and the art form studied in relation to some aspects of societal, cultural, historical or personal contexts;

  • demonstrate an informed opinion of the art form studied in the context of their own artwork;
  • articulate an idea, theme or personal interpretation to a point of realization;
  • develop skills and apply the techniques and processes involved in creating, performing and/or presenting art;
  • give an informed description of the progress they have made so far and identify strategies to develop and improve their artistic processes;
  • evaluate their work;
  • consider feedback when identifying strategies to develop and improve;
  • show commitment in developing their own artistic processes;
  • support, encourage and work with their peers in a positive way;
  • understand how the arts play a role in developing and expressing personal and cultural identities;
  • appreciate how the arts innovate and communicate across time and culture;
  • experience the process of making art in a variety of situations;
  • become more effective learners, inquirers and thinkers.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Digital camera and software manipulation is art

Human Ingenuity: Visual principles are expressive

Environments: Art has common environments

Health & Social Education: Visual art has cultural impact

Geometry (8-1) Year 3

Course Description

Textbook: Geometry, Prentice Hall Mathematics and ALEKS – online course

Overview:
In this Year 3 Geometry course students will be provided with experiences that deepen their understanding of two and three-dimensional objects and their properties. Deductive and inductive reasoning as well as investigative strategies in drawing conclusions are stressed. Properties and relationships of geometric objects include the study of: points, lines, angles, and planes; polygons, with a special focus on quadrilaterals, triangles, right triangles; circles; and solids. An understanding of proof and logic is developed throughout this course. Technology skills will be employed to facilitate learning. Students will apply their knowledge to make and test conjectures.

Topics Covered:
Tools of geometry, reasoning and proof, parallel and perpendicular lines, congruent triangles, relationships within triangles, quadrilaterals, similarities, special right triangles, area, surface area and volume, and circles

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, reflection written and oral, educational games, exit tickets

Summative Assessment:
Unit Tests, trimester tests, pattern investigation, real-life problem solving

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s:
Communication, social, self management, thinking

Global Context:
Identities and relationships, orientation in space and time

Key Concepts:
Form, logic, relationships

Mathematics, MYP Year 3, Aims and Objectives:
The aims of MYP mathematics are to encourage and enable students to:

  • enjoy mathematics, develop curiosity and begin to appreciate its elegance and power
  • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics
  • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts
  • develop logical, critical and creative thinking
  • develop confidence, perseverance, and independence in mathematical thinking and problem-solving
  • develop powers of generalization and abstraction
  • apply and transfer skills to a wide range of real-life situations, other areas of knowledge and future developments
  • appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other
  • appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the work of mathematicians and the applications of mathematics
  • appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives
  • appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other areas of knowledge
  • develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to pursue further studies in mathematics
  • develop the ability to reflect critically upon their own work and the work of others.

The objectives of MYP mathematics are:

  • A: Knowledge and Understanding
  • B: Investigating Patterns
  • C: Communicating
  • D: Applying mathematics in real-life context

Prior to 2014:

Human Ingenuity: Square roots and the Pythagorean Theorem

Environments: What happens when you reduce and enlarge an object

Community & Service: Make proposals for school addition and/or redesign and area

Health & Social Education: Product design and packaging


Humanities Year 1

Course Description

Textbook: Journey Across Time: The Early Ages. Glencoe McGraw Hill, 2010.

Additional Resource: World Adventure in Time and Place, McGraw Hill.

Overview:
Humanities at St. James Academy involves the reflective and open-minded study of people as individuals and as contributing members of world societies. This knowledge enables students to develop an awareness of themselves as individuals and as members of a widening array of communities. Their journey moves from a study of self to exploring their roles as contributing citizens of state, nation, and the World.

Year 1 students explore political systems, past and present, and analyze them to develop an awareness of the principles of government and the various governmental institutions which have developed throughout history. Students compare and contrast the political systems of various cultures, as well.

During Humanities studies, students develop and extend their writing and ability. Research results are organized and presented in written and oral reports. The development of these skills is extended throughout the years and expository writing is continually developed. Technology and the implementation of a laptop program enhance students’ writing, as well.

Overall, the Humanities curriculum aims to develop a student’s knowledge and awareness of others which will allow him/her to live a humane and compassionate life.

Formative Assessment:
Quizzes, map work, drills, class work and participation, homework, biography role playing, simulations

Summative Assessment
Tests, mid-term and final exams, research paper, IB MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s:
Map reading skills measuring distance (longitude, latitude, map legend, map scale, map grids, kinds of maps), convergent and divergent thinking, knowledge acquisition skills, collaborative skills

Key Concepts:
Time, place and space

Related Concepts:
Identity, Causality, Sustainability

Global Context:
Orientation in Time an Space

Humanities, MYP Year 1 Aims and Objectives:
At the end of Humanities year 1 students will be able to:
use humanities terminology in context;

  • demonstrate subject content knowledge and understanding through the use of basic descriptions and explanations, supported by a limited number of relevant facts and/or examples;
  • examine the individual’s role in a context of time and/or place;
  • know that time can be measured and perceived in different ways;
  • develop an awareness of links between people, places and/or events through time;
  • recognize the similarities and differences that exist between people, places and events through time;
  • identify constraints and opportunities afforded by location;
  • understand, identify, and make basic comparisons between social structures and controls;
  • analyze information from selected sources;
  • plan, carry out, and present basic individual and group investigations;
  • organize basic information in a logically sequenced manner;
  • present and express basic information and ideas in a clear and concise manner;
  • clearly document sources of information using appropriate conventions.
  • develop an understanding of chronological events in the study of world history;
  • develop an understanding and appreciation of the differences and similarities among world cultures;
  • develop the ability to analyze and draw conclusion from the study
  • of historical events;
  • demonstrate the ability to write a well-organized research paper.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Examine the significance of early civilizations

Human Ingenuity – Evaluate social and ethical factors; Humans inspire change

Health & Social Education: Investigate the benefits and challenges created by social and technological change

Environments: One World, Our Earth; Geography skills; environments effect change

Humanities Year 2

Course Description

Textbook: Exploring Our World. Glencoe

Overview:
Humanities at St. James Academy involve the reflective and open-minded study of people as individuals and as contributing members of World societies. This knowledge enables students to develop an awareness of themselves as individuals and as members of a widening array of communities. Their journey moves from a study of self to exploring their roles as contributing citizens of state, nation, and the world.

Year 2 students, in this course, examine every area of every continent of the world, from three different perspectives- geographical, historical, and cultural. Knowledge is extended through research, map study, and experiential simulation exercises. Current events are a continuous part of the Humanities curriculum. Students learn to examine their place in the world and the influence of events on their lives and the world around them. They continue to develop as knowledgeable inquirers, and caring, contributing members of society.

During Humanities studies students develop and extend their writing skills and ability. Research results are organized and presented in written and oral reports. Technology and the implementation of a Year 2 laptop program (One laptop per student) enhances students’ writing, as well.

Formative Assessment:
Quizzes, map work, drills, class work and participation, homework, research paper, and simulations

Summative Assessment
Tests, mid-term and final exams, IB MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Map reading skills measuring distance (longitude, latitude, map legend, map scale, map grids, kinds of maps), convergent and divergent thinking, knowledge acquisition skills, collaborative skills

Key Concepts:
Systems

Related Concepts:
Commerce

Global Context:
Personal and Cultural Expression

Humanities, MYP Year 2 Aims and Objectives:

At the end of Humanities year 2 students will be able to:

  • know and use basic humanities terminology in context;
  • demonstrate subject content knowledge and understanding through the use of basic descriptions and explanations, supported by a limited number of relevant facts and/or examples;
  • recognize their role as individuals in a context of time and/or place
  • demonstrate an awareness of links between people, places and/or events through time;
  • recognize the similarities and differences that exist between people, places and events through time;
  • identify constraints and opportunities afforded by location;
  • identify, understand and compare how basic systems, models or institutions operate;
  • identify different perceptions of places, societies and environments;
  • observe and record basic information from selected sources;
  • use different media and technologies to research, select, interpret and communicate simple data;
  • plan, carry out, and present basic individual and group investigations;
  • communicate information that is relevant to the topic, and organize basic information in a logically sequenced manner;
  • present and express basic information and ideas in a clear and concise manner;
  • clearly document sources of information using appropriate conventions;
  • demonstrate an ability to read topographic maps, political maps, geographical maps, thematic maps, and globes;
  • apply an understanding of major geographical concepts and terms;
  • apply the ability to use technology to enhance learning.

Prior to 2014:

Human Ingenuity: Factors impacting people’s lives and the creative responses to these circumstances

Community & Service: International Micro-loans

Environments: Geography skills; Environments effect change; Exploring cause/effect relationships in interactions of man and environments

Health & Social Education: Investigate changing population trends and effects on human welfare

Humanities Year 3

Course Description

Textbook: World History, Modern Times, Glencoe

Overview:
Humanities at St. James Academy involve the reflective and open-minded study of people as individuals and as contributing members of World societies. This knowledge enables students to develop an awareness of themselves as individuals and as members of a widening array of communities. Their journey moves from a study of self to exploring their roles as contributing citizens of state, nation, and the World.

The Year 3 Humanities curriculum starts with an examination of world history since the Middle Ages and continues into the 21st Century. Students learn to examine their place in the world and the influence of events on their lives and the world around them. Through understanding they continue to develop as knowledgeable inquirers, and caring, contributing members of society. Current events are a continuous part of the Humanities curriculum as students reinforce their character as principled, balanced, caring members of the world.

During Humanities studies students develop and extend their writing skills and ability. Research results are organized and presented in written and oral reports. The development of these skills is extended throughout the years and expository writing is continually developed.

Formative Assessment:
Quizzes, map work, drills, class work and participation, homework, research paper, biography role playing, cooperative learning project, document analysis worksheets, essays, teacher evaluation of oral participation, visual metaphor- written analysis worksheet/group evaluation/group discussion

Summative Assessment:
Tests, mid-term and final exams, IB MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s:

Map reading skills, convergent and divergent thinking, knowledge acquisition skills, communication skills, team collaborative skills, critical thinking skills, research skills, technical skills, and reflection skills

Key Concepts:
Global interaction

Related Concepts:
Geography management and intervention

Global Context:
Cultural expression

Humanities, MYP Year 3, Aims and Objectives:
At the end of Humanities Year 3 students will be able to:

  • know and use humanities terminology in context;
  • demonstrate subject content knowledge and understanding through the use of descriptions and explanations, supported by relevant facts and examples;
  • understand the individual’s role as part of a group in a context of time and place;
  • recognize and describe the similarities and differences that exist between people, places and events through time;
  • identify and provide some explanations for short-term and long-term causes of change;
  • identify and provide some explanations for links between causes, processes, and consequences;
  • recognize and describe examples that illustrate continuity and change;
  • identify, understand and compare how increasingly complex systems, models and institutions operate;
  • understand, identify, and compare social structures and controls;
  • understand, identify, and compare rights and responsibilities within systems;
  • recognize issues of equality, justice, and responsibility;
  • know when and how to take responsible action.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Simulations involves working in a group to propose legislation to solve society’s ills

Human Ingenuity: Investigating the evolution of political systems, the actions of these systems and the consequences of these actions

Environments: Investigate human behavior in varying environments of war and peace

Health & Social Education: Investigating the benefits and challenges created by social and technological change

Introduction to Algebra I (8-3) Year 3

Course Description

Textbook: Algebra I, Part 1 and Part II, McDougal Littel, & ALEKS Online Course

Overview:
This Year 3 Introduction to Algebra I course engages students in number patterns, orders of operation, algebraic expressions and equations. Students develop knowledge in the modeling of integers and solving multi-step equations, as well as graphing linear equations. The course allows students to explore number theory including factoring, powers and exponents, and scientific notation. Students begin to keep an IB MYP math journal of concepts, terms, mathematical writing, and examples. IB MYP projects are ongoing as we make connections and integrate with additional subject areas.

Topics Covered:
Functions, real numbers, rational numbers, algebraic expressions, solving linear equations, graphing equations, graphing linear equations, writing linear equations, inequalities, geometry and measurement, and probability

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, reflection written and/or oral, journaling, graphing

Summative Assessment:
Unit Tests, mid-term and final exams, MYP projects

ATL’s: Knowledge acquisition, critical thinking skills, communication skills, collaborative skills note taking, recognizing concepts and applying skills, using a calculator, using appropriate technology skills, developing and applying problem-solving strategies, approximating data, diagramming, organizing data

Human Ingenuity: Exploring the application of mathematical knowledge

Environments: Population growth / resources

Community & Service: Apply different forms of representation (graphs, tables, and diagrams) to communicate facts and figures to the school community

Health & Social Education: Informed, responsible choices, and positive attitudes lead to balanced and healthy lives for themselves and other members of their community

Mathematics, MYP Year 3, Aims and Objectives:
At the end of Year 3, students should be able to demonstrate basic knowledge and understanding of the following branches of mathematics: • number • algebra • geometry and trigonometry • statistics and probability discrete mathematics by being able to:

  • know and demonstrate understanding of some of the basic concepts of number, algebra, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics;
  • use concept-specific strategies to solve simple problems in both familiar and unfamiliar situations including those in real-life contexts;
  • apply basic rules correctly to solve simple problems including those in real-life contexts;
  • apply basic inquiry and mathematical problem-solving techniques, with guidance from the teacher, by identifying variables, posing relevant questions, organizing data and using an appropriate model;
  • recognize simple patterns similar to previously seen examples;
  • describe simple patterns in words and/or diagrams;
  • describe simple mathematical relationships;
  • use appropriate mathematical language (notation, symbols, terminology) in both oral and written communications, with guidance from the teacher;
  • use different forms of mathematical representation (simple formulae, diagrams, tables, charts, graphs and models);
  • state, in writing and/or verbally, the steps followed in solving simple problems;
  • consider the reasonableness of their results in the context of the problem;
  • consider the importance of their findings, with guidance from the teacher;
  • describe simple patterns as relationships or general rules.

Language and Literature Year 1

Textbooks/Novels:
Vocabulary and Classical Roots A
6 + 1 Traits of Writing, Scholastic Professional Books
Novels:
1. Tuck Everlasting, Natalie Babbit
2. The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros
3. Call of the Wild, Jack London,
4. A Wrinkle in Time
, Madeleine L’Engle
Selected short stories
Selected poetry

Overview:
The Language and Literature Year 1 curriculum encourages students to become enthusiastic and confident listeners,
speakers, readers, writers, and thinkers through an integrated program combining reading/literature, grammar, spelling, vocabulary, and composition. Skills are modeled which address varied learning styles. Students read across the curriculum and often use trade books related to their study in Humanities, Science, and/or global issues. Writing skills are essential therefore, students write frequently and receive teacher and peer review of their writing assignments through journaling and creative writing and nonfiction writing. Students are exposed to traditional vocabulary, and grammar instruction. Communication, collaboration, and an open minded approach assist students to be successful in the 6 + 1 Traits of Writing curriculum. This curriculum is structured to build confidence in each student’s understanding of the writing process and his/her ability to communicate.

Topics Covered:
Grammar, composition, literature, vocabulary

Formative Assessment:
Class work (individual and group), homework, quizzes, review and oral games, reflections written and/or oral, creative writing and nonfiction writing

Summative Assessment:
Unit tests, mid-term and final exams, MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Note taking; knowledge acquisition; ask and answer pertinent questions while analyzing figurative language; read and interpret a variety of texts critically; journaling; communication using specific techniques to develop voice

Global Contexts:
Identities and relationships, scientific and technological innovation, orientation in time and space

IB MYP Year 1 Aims and Objectives:
At the end of Year 1 students will be able to:

  • The objectives for Language and Literature Year 1 deal with skills, knowledge, understanding and attitudes associated with both language and literature. In particular, the language skills of speaking, listening, reading, writing, and viewing are all included in the following objectives;
  • begin to use language to narrate, describe, explain, argue, persuade, inform, entertain and express feelings;
  • express a relevant personal response to literary and non-literary texts and demonstrate the ability to approach age appropriate works independently;
  • understand some connotations within a language in order to interpret the author’s or speaker’s intentions;
  • express ideas with clarity and coherence in both oral and written communication;
  • structure ideas and arguments, both orally and in writing, in a logical way and support them with some relevant examples;
  • distinguish the main ideas in an age appropriate text from some of the secondary ideas;
  • begin to understand self and global identity through literacy study
  • build reading skills, confidence, independence, and curiosity as they read for recreation, research, personal growth, and awareness;
  • evaluate a variety of formats including; books, computer accessed information, periodicals, and newspapers;
  • develop critical thinking skills and problem solving strategies by responding to literature in both written and oral formats;
  • apply a variety of comprehension skills, phonological awareness, sight-reading, and context clues to develop fluency and understanding;
  • communicate effectively using receptive and expressive language;
  • develop abstract thinking skills through the examination of literature;
  • become familiar with and analyze the sound-symbol relationship and structural characteristics of the English language;
  • develop confidence in receptive and expressive communication skills in varied settings.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Examining literacy themes related to social issues impacting the community

Human Ingenuity: Exerting an influence through writing by demonstrating voice

Environments: Examining how the environment may be depicted differently in the written word across time and space

Health & Social Education: Reviewing the social and ethical impact of specific literary works

Language and Literature Year 2

Course Description

Overview:

The Language A, Language and Literature, Year 2 curriculum continues to encourage students to be confident listeners, speakers, readers, writers, risk takers, and thinkers through an integrated program combining reading/literature, grammar, spelling, vocabulary, and composition. Students participate in student-run newsletters.

Writing skills continue to be stressed as an essential source of communication for all students. Students write frequently and receive teacher and peer review of their writing. Students are exposed to an enriched vocabulary program. Using communication, collaboration, and an open minded, balanced approach students are encouraged to become risk takers in their writing. Language A Year 2 encourages each student to develop an enthusiasm for writing, reading, and communication in the 21st Century.

Short Story Unit Including:

  • “The Summer of the Beautiful White Horse” By William Saroyan
  • “The Laugher” by Heinrich Boll
  • “Love Your Only Mother” By David Michael Kaplan
  • “The Elephant” by Sławomir Mrożek
  • “One of These Days,” By Gabrial Garcia Maquez
  • “Harrison Bergeron,” By Kurt Vonnegut
  • “The Chrysanthemums” by John Steinbeck
  • “Gift of the Maji,” by O’Henry

Novels Read:

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
A Girl Named Disaster by Nancy Farmer
Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Also including – selected poetry from Robert Frost, Edgar Allen Poe, William Shakespeare, and other classic authors and poets.

GrammarRules of the Game II from Page, Guthrie, and Sable

-Simple subjects, simple predicates
-Direct/indirect objects
-Prepositions/objects of the preposition
-Subjective/objective complements
-Generative grammar/homonyms

-Noun, adjective, adverbial, and verb phrase

-Participles and absolute phrases

-Phrase vs. clause identification

VocabularyClassical Roots B by Flowers, Selected Vocabulary in Context (focus on Greek and Latin Roots)

Formative Assessments: Weekly creative writing exemplars, vocabulary quizzes, literature quizzes/reading comprehension checks, newsletter articles, grammar quizzes,

Summative Assessments: Trimester tests, debates, socratic seminars, essays.

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Communication skills, collaboration skills, organization skills, affective skills, reflection skills, critical thinking skills, creative thinking skills, transfer skills

Global Contexts: Identities and relationships, personal and cultural expression

IB MYP Year 2 Aims and Objectives:
At the end of Year 2 students will be able to:

  • express a relevant personal response to literary and non-literary texts and demonstrate the ability to approach age appropriate works independently;
  • ideas and arguments, both orally and in writing, are presented in a logical way and support them with some relevant examples;
  • examine the language, content, structure, meaning and significance of both familiar and previously unseen pieces of age appropriate writing;
  • compare age-appropriate texts and connect themes to show similarities or differences across genres;
  • be able to express an informed personal response to literary and non-literary texts and demonstrate the ability to approach age appropriate works independently;
  • apply correct grammar with appropriate and increasingly varied sentence structure;
  • continue to develop skills to read for recreation, research, personal growth, and awareness;
  • apply critical thinking skills and problem solving strategies by responding to literature in both written and oral formats;
  • apply a variety of comprehension skills, phonological awareness, sight-reading, and context clues to develop fluency and understanding;
  • examine the meaning of vocabulary words from related readings at appropriate levels;
  • apply grammar rules for usage in written and oral communication both academically (formally) and personally (informally).

Objectives: Analyzing, organizing, producing text, using language

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Exploring concepts of identity, community, and culture

Human Ingenuity: Examining the ideas of authors on topics which create fear in readers; and examining the systems of values as themes in works of literature

Environments: Looking at how the environment may be depicted differently in the written word across time and space

Health & Social Education: One World Our Earth: Continue to examine the social impact of literature

Language and Literature Year 3

Course Description

Textbooks/Novels:
6 + 1 Traits of Writing, Scholastic Professional Books
Composition & Creative Writing for the Middle Grades, MacKenzie, Joy
Vocabulary from Classical Roots C,D, Fifer, Norma
Novels:
1. No Promises in the Wind, Irene Hunt
2. Kindred, Octovia Butter
3. The Wave, Todd Strasser
4. To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee Harper
5. The Crucible, Arthur Miller
Selected short stories
Selected poetry

Overview:
The Language and Literature Year 3 curriculum continues to encourage students to be confident listeners, speakers, readers, writers, risk takers, and thinkers through an integrated program combining reading/literature, grammar, spelling, vocabulary, and composition. Students read across the curriculum and often use trade books related to their study in Humanities, Science, and/or Global Issues. Writing skills continue to be stressed as an essential source of communication for all students. Students write frequently and receive teacher and peer review of their writing assignments through journaling, creative writing and nonfiction writing. Students are exposed to a Latin and Greek based vocabulary program, Classical Roots. Using communication, collaboration, and an open minded, balanced approach students become successful writers. Language and Literature Year 3 encourages each student to develop an enthusiasm for writing, reading and communication in the 21st Century.

Topics Covered:
Grammar, Composition, Literature, Vocabulary

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, review and oral games, reflections written and/or oral, creative writing and nonfiction writing

Summative Assessment:
Unit tests, mid-term and final exams, MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Note taking, ask and answer pertinent questions while analyzing figurative language, read and interpret a variety of texts critically, develops and supports opinions concerning topics and works, knowledge acquisition skills, communication skills, and collaborative skills, read and interpret a novel and short stories

Global Contexts:
Identities and relationships, orientation in time and space, personal and cultural expression, fairness and development

IB MYP Year 3 Aims and Objectives:
At the end of Year 3 students will be able to:

  • use language to narrate, describe, explain, argue, persuade, inform, entertain, express feelings and begin to analyze;
  • express an informed personal response to literary and non-literary texts and demonstrate the ability to approach age-appropriate works independently;
  • understand many of the connotations within a language in order to interpret the author’s or speaker’s intentions;
  • express ideas with clarity and coherence in both oral and written communication;
  • structure ideas and arguments, both orally and in writing, in a logical way and support them with relevant examples;
  • use and understand an appropriate range of vocabulary and idiom;
  • read and evaluate a variety of formats including books, computer accessed information, periodicals, and newspapers;
  • expand critical thinking skills and problem solving strategies by responding to literature in both written and oral formats;
  • apply a variety of comprehension skills, phonological awareness, sight-reading, and context clues to develop fluency and understanding;
  • communicate effectively using receptive and expressive language;
  • demonstrate abstract thinking skills through examination of themes in literature;
  • derive the meaning of vocabulary words from Greek and Latin roots.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Investigating economic problems and social problems and their effects on individuals and communities; Developing knowledge and understanding of others

Human Ingenuity: Comparing injustices in literature to current social injustices

Environments: Examining how the environment may be depicted differently in the written word across time and space

Health & Social Education: Examining the ideas of an author through the study of his/her work; examining the social and ethical impact of specific literary works

Language B Year 1 (French & Spanish)

Course Description

Each student elects upon faculty recommendation or availability of course either French or Spanish for Middle School study.

Spanish Textbook: Paso A Paso, Prentice Hall
French Textbook: Nouveaux Copains, Harcourt Brace

Overview:
Language B (French or Spanish) is offered to all Year 1, 2, and 3 students as an inclusive course that promotes intercultural understanding through basic knowledge and appreciation of the World around us. In the Year 1 course introduction to oral communication is stressed; and the students rapidly learn to express themselves by speaking French/Spanish using vocabulary-rich practical everyday language. Each classroom unit builds on skills used and knowledge learned in prior units. Role-playing, dialogue supplement, written and oral drills, and exercises are used to promote understanding. Audiovisual materials are employed to improve the students’ listening skills. Grammar and writing skills are acquired to complement French/Spanish conversation. In addition to language acquisition, students explore the similarities and diversities of other cultures, as well as customs and holidays. Throughout the year various IB MYP projects are designed to higlight the cultures of Spanish/French-speaking countries.

Topics Covered:
Year 1 will be covering chapters 1 – 4 in Paso A Paso (Spanish) or Nouveaux Copains (French) as well as cultural and grammatical concepts not included in those chapters. The following is an example of some of the topics that will be covered throughout the year:
Why study Spanish / French?; greetings, introductions / Where are you from?; counting, colors, classroom vocabulary; likes/dislikes (activities); describing yourself and others; cultural appreciation: The Day of the Dead, Pascua, Cinco de Mayo; Mardi Gras; location of spanish/french-speaking countries; school vocabulary; telling time; sports, pasttimes, tv, personal pronouns; verb conjugation, noun gender, irregular verbs); activities throughout the year (seasons and how they are celebrated); expressing possession.

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, oral games, written and/or oral reflections, conversations

Summative Assessment:
Unit tests, trimester test and final exam, MYP projects

Approaches to learning:
ATL’s: Note taking, language acquisition skills, oral communication skills,

IB MYP Year 1 Aims and Objectives:
At the end of this Year 1 course students should be able to:
communicate information, ideas, and opinions;

  • demonstrate comprehension of specific factual information and attitudes expressed in spoken and written contexts;
  • identify main ideas and supporting details and draw conclusions from spoken and written texts;
  • understand and appropriately use structures and vocabulary;
  • engage actively in oral production using comprehensible pronunciation;
  • students should be able to communicate information, ideas and opinions;
  • students should be able to understand and appropriately use basic structures and vocabulary;
  • request and provide information in simple, familiar situations in both spoken and written contexts;
  • use language(s) effectively as a means of practical communication, providing a sound base of communication skills necessary for future study, work, and leisure;
  • understand the nature of language and the process of language learning, which comprises the integration of linguistic, cultural and social components;
  • offer insight into the cultural characteristics of the communities where the language(s) is (are) spoken;
  • encourage an awareness and understanding of the perspectives of people from other cultures;
  • foster curiosity, a lifelong interest, and enjoyment in language learning.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Develop an intercultural respect, understanding, and appreciation of different cultures to help create a more peaceful World

Human Ingenuity: Make connections to other disciplines and situations by applying the knowledge learned in World Language class

Environments: Introduction of cultural and environmental characteristics of communities where Language B is spoken

Health & Social Education: Introduction of perspectives of people from other cultures

Language B Year 2 (French & Spanish)

Course Description

Each student elects upon faculty recommendation or availability of course either French or Spanish for Middle School study.

Spanish Textbook: Paso A Paso, Prentice Hall
French Textbook: Nouveaux Copains, Harcourt Brace

Overview:
Language B (French or Spanish) is offered to all Year 1, 2, and 3 students as an inclusive course that promotes intercultural understanding through basic knowledge and appreciation of the World around us. In the Year 2 course oral communication is stressed; and the students continue to express themselves by speaking French/Spanish using vocabulary-rich practical everyday language. Each classroom unit builds on skills used and knowledge learned in prior units and years. Role-playing, dialogue supplement, written and oral drills, and exercises are used to promote understanding. Audiovisual materials are employed to improve the students’ listening skills. Grammar and writing skills are acquired to complement French/Spanish conversation. In addition to language acquisition, students explore the similarities and diversities of other cultures, as well as customs and holidays. Throughout the year various IB MYP projects are designed to highlight the cultures of Spanish/French-speaking countries.

Topics Covered:
Year 2 covers Chapters 5 – 8 in Paso A Paso or Nouveaux Copains as well as cultural and grammatical concepts to supplement those chapters. The following is an example of some of the topics that will be covered throughout the year: Describing yourself, your family, your home, food, travels and others; cultural appreciation: The Day of the Dead, Pascua, Cinco de Mayo, Mardi Gras; location of Spanish/French-speaking countries; expressing possession, possessive adjectives, preterite tense, and direct object pronouns

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, oral games, written and/or oral reflections, conversations

Summative Assessment:
Unit tests, trimester and final exam, MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Note taking, language acquisition skills, oral and written reflections

IB MYP Year 2 Aims and Objectives:
At the end of this Year 2 course students should be able to:

  • apply appropriate terminology to show aesthetic and critical awareness.
  • communicate information, ideas, and opinions;
  • demonstrate comprehension of specific factual information and attitudes expressed in spoken and written contexts;
  • identify main ideas and supporting details and draw conclusions from spoken and written texts;
  • understand and appropriately use structures and vocabulary;
  • engage actively in oral production using comprehensible pronunciation;
  • students should be able to communicate information, ideas, and opinions;
  • appropriately use basic structures and vocabulary;
  • request and provide information in simple, familiar situations in both spoken and written contexts;
  • use language(s) effectively as a means of practical communication, providing a sound base of communication skills necessary for future study, work, and leisure;
  • develop an understanding for the nature of language and the process of total language learning, which comprises the integration of linguistic, cultural and social components;
  • offer insight into the cultural characteristics of the communities where the language(s) is (are) spoken;
  • encourage an awareness and understanding of the perspectives of people from other cultures;
  • foster curiosity, a lifelong interest and enjoyment in language learning.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Develop an intercultural understanding, appreciation, and respect of different cultures to create a more peaceful World

Human Ingenuity: Make connections to other disciplines and situations by applying the knowledge learned in World Language class

Environments: Various weather/climates affect the way we live

Health & Social Education: A healthy meal can be a cultural experience

Language B Year 3 (French & Spanish)

Course Description

Each student elects upon faculty recommendation or availability of course either French or Spanish for Middle School study.

Spanish Textbook: Paso A Paso, Prentice Hall
French Textbook: Nouveaux Copains, Harcourt Brace

Overview:
Language B (French or Spanish) is offered to Year 1, 2, and 3 students as an inclusive course that promotes intercultural understanding through basic knowledge and appreciation of the World around us. In the Year 3 course oral communication is expected; and the students express themselves by speaking French/Spanish using vocabulary-rich practical everyday language. Each classroom unit builds on skills used and knowledge learned in prior units and years. Role-playing, dialogue supplement, written and oral drills, and exercises are used to promote understanding. Audiovisual materials are employed to improve the students’ listening skills. Grammar and writing skills are acquired to complement French/Spanish conversation. In addition to language acquisition, students explore the similarities and diversities of other cultures, as well as customs and holidays. Throughout the year various IB MYP projects are designed to highlight the cultures of Spanish/French-speaking countries.

Topics Covered:
Year 3 covers Chapters 9 – 12 in Paso A Paso or Nouveaux Copains as well as cultural and grammatical concepts to supplement those chapters. The following is an example of some of the topics that will be covered throughout the year:
movies and tv, going out, shopping, a social event, health, communities, cultural appreciation: The Day of the Dead, Pascua – Easter, Cinco de Mayo, Location of Spanish/French-speaking countries, irregular verbs in the present and past tenses, activities throughout the year (seasons and how they are celebrated)

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, oral games, written and/or oral reflections, communication skills

Summative Assessment:
Unit tests, trimester test and final exam, MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Note taking; Language acquisition skills; Improving written communication skills; Reading for understanding and responding effectively

IB MYP Year 3 Aims and Objectives:
At the end of this Year 3 course students should be able to:
engage actively in oral production using comprehensible pronunciation and
communicate information, ideas, and opinions;

  • understand and appropriately use structures and vocabulary;
  • request and provide information in both spoken and written contexts;
  • engage actively in oral production using comprehensible pronunciation and intonation;
  • express understanding through correctly responding to familiar and spontaneous situations;
  • student’s pronunciation and/or intonation have occasional mistakes, but these do not interfere with comprehensibility;
  • structure their work clearly and effectively, which adds to the clarity and coherence of the message;
  • use language(s) effectively as a means of practical communication, providing a sound base of communication skills necessary for future study, work and leisure;
  • understand the nature of language and the process of total language learning, which comprises the integration of linguistic, cultural, and social components;
  • encourage an awareness and understanding of the perspectives of people from other cultures.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Promote in others an intercultural understanding, appreciation for, and respect of different cultures so that they may help create a better and more peaceful World

Human Ingenuity: Through creative holiday celebrations understand connections to other disciplines and situations by applying the knowledge learned in World Language class

Environments: Understand the environments of countries whom speak Spanish and/or French; Environmental & cultural differences / similarities affect our social choices

Health & Social Education: Comparing and contrasting social issues in different parts of the world and how the different cultures deal with them

Life Science Year 1

Course Description

Textbook: Interactive Science, Pearson

Overview:

Life science provides students with a chance to explore the interactions and functions of systems in a variety of models including the human body and ecology. They examine patterns of energy flow in various environments. They use their knowledge to evaluate the consequences of decisions.

Topics Covered: human body systems; genetics; taxonomy; ecology

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, reflection written and/or oral,

Summative Assessment:
Unit Tests, trimester tests and final exams, MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s
: Knowledge acquisition, critical thinking skills, communication skills, collaborative skills note taking, recognizing concepts and applying skills, using a calculator, using appropriate technology skills, developing and applying problem-solving strategies, approximating data, diagramming, organizing data

Global Contexts:

Identities and relationships, personal and cultural expression, orientation in time and space, scientific and technical innovation, globalization and sustainability, fairness and development

Key Concepts:
Change, relationships, systems

IB Aims:

The aims of MYP sciences are to encourage and enable students to:

  • understand and appreciate science and its implications;
  • consider science as a human endeavor with benefits and limitations;
  • cultivate analytical, inquiring and flexible minds that pose questions, solve problems, construct explanations and judge arguments;
  • develop skills to design and perform investigations, evaluate evidence and reach conclusions;
  • build an awareness of the need to effectively collaborate and communicate;
  • apply language skills and knowledge in a variety of real-life contexts;
  • develop sensitivity towards the living and non-living environments;
  • reflect on learning experiences and make informed choices.

IB Objectives:
Knowing and understanding, inquiring and designing, processing and evaluating, reflecting on the impact of science

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Investigating scientific issues and their impact in the local community and/or global society, as well as reflecting on topics studied

Human Ingenuity: Appreciate the nature of scientific inquiry and real life scientific endeavor

Environments: Earth’s Birthday; exploring how human activity and exploitation of natural resources play a role in the sustainability of natural capital

Health & Social Education: Development of healthy habits, discussing social, cultural, and economic ramifications of scientific developments related to health

 

Pre-Algebra (6-1) Year 1

Course Description

Textbook: Pre-Algebra. Glencoe McGraw Hill, 2008 and ALEKS – online course

Overview: This Year 1 Pre-Algebra course begins with a study of counting principles including a rigorous investigation into combinations and permutations. This course includes topics in number patterns, orders of operation, algebraic expressions and linear equations. Students develop knowledge in the modeling of integers, solving multi-step equations, and problem solving. The course allows students to explore number theory including factoring, exponents, and scientific notation. Students explore rational numbers, and the relationship between fractions, decimals, and percentages. Additionally, students investigate proportions, dimensional analysis, and calculating percent increase and decrease. Students also study geometric relationships and measurement.

Topics Covered: Problem solving; variables and equations; ordered pairs; integers; solving equations; factors and fractions; rational numbers; linear equations; inequalities; functions; real numbers; right triangles; two and three dimensional figures; counting principles and statistics.

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, reflection written and oral, educational games, exit tickets

Summative Assessment:
Unit Tests, trimester tests, pattern investigation, real-life problem solving

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s:
Communication, social, self management, thinking

Global Context:
Identities and relationships, orientation in space and time

Key Concepts:
Form, logic, relationships

Mathematics, MYP Year 1, Aims and Objectives:
The aims of MYP mathematics are to encourage and enable students to:

  • enjoy mathematics, develop curiosity and begin to appreciate its elegance and power
  • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics
  • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts
  • develop logical, critical and creative thinking
  • develop confidence, perseverance, and independence in mathematical thinking and problem-solving
  • develop powers of generalization and abstraction
  • apply and transfer skills to a wide range of real-life situations, other areas of knowledge and future developments
  • appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other
  • appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the work of mathematicians and the applications of mathematics
  • appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives
  • appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other areas of knowledge
  • develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to pursue further studies in mathematics
  • develop the ability to reflect critically upon their own work and the work of others.

The objectives of MYP mathematics are:

  • A: Knowledge and Understanding
  • B: Investigating Patterns
  • C: Communicating
  • D: Applying mathematics in real-life context

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Presenting data to the school community

Human Ingenuity: Exploring the application of mathematical knowledge

Environments: Using data from multiple aspects of the school environment to create informative diagrams

Health & Social Education: Students analyze and evaluate relationships by exploring various graphs of data

Mathematics (6-2) Year 1

Course Description

Textbook: Middle School Mathematics Course 2, McDougal Littell and ALEKS – online course

Overview:
This course introduces students to integer computation and the use of inverse operations to solve problems using simple and multi-step equations. It includes an advanced study of number theory and continues into percent relationships, data analysis, and geometry. This course is problem solving oriented and develops the students’ critical thinking skills.

Topics Covered:
Number Sense, number theory, introduction to algebra, rational numbers and percent relationships, integers and coordinate plane, proportions, the language of algebra, euclidian geometry and measurement, data representation and graphs

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, reflections written and oral, educational games, exit tickets

Summative Assessment:
Unit Tests, trimester tests, pattern investigation, real-life problem solving

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s:
Communication, social, self management, thinking

Global Context:
Identities and relationships, orientation in space and time

Key Concepts:
Form, logic, relationships

Mathematics, MYP Year 1, Aims and Objectives:
The aims of MYP mathematics are to encourage and enable students to:

  • enjoy mathematics, develop curiosity and begin to appreciate its elegance and power
  • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics
  • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts
  • develop logical, critical and creative thinking
  • develop confidence, perseverance, and independence in mathematical thinking and problem-solving
  • develop powers of generalization and abstraction
  • apply and transfer skills to a wide range of real-life situations, other areas of knowledge and future developments
  • appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other
  • appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the work of mathematicians and the applications of mathematics
  • appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives
  • appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other areas of knowledge
  • develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to pursue further studies in mathematics
  • develop the ability to reflect critically upon their own work and the work of others.

The objectives of MYP mathematics are:

  • A: Knowledge and Understanding
  • B: Investigating Patterns
  • C: Communicating
  • D: Applying mathematics in real-life context

 

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Presenting data to the school community

Human Ingenuity: Exploring the application of mathematical knowledge

Environments: Using data from multiple aspects of the school environment to create informative diagrams

Health & Social Education: Students analyze and evaluate relationships by exploring various graphs of data

Mathematics (6-3) Year 1

Course Description

Textbook: Middle School Math Course 1 McDougal Littell 2005

Overview:
This Year 1 mathematics course is designed for students to acquire the computational skills required to be successful in pre-algebra. Students examine patterns to create generalizations and models to represent real-world scenarios. The concepts of equivalence, quantities, and systems are emphasized.

Topics Covered:
operations with whole numbers, decimals, and fractions; number theory; proportions; percents; probability; plane geometry; solid geometry; data/statistics

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, reflection written and/or oral, math journaling

Summative Assessment:
Unit Tests, trimester tests and final exams, MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Knowledge acquisition, critical thinking skills, communication skills, collaborative skills note taking, recognizing concepts and applying skills, using a calculator, using appropriate technology skills, developing and applying problem-solving strategies, approximating data, diagramming, organizing data

Global Contexts:
Identities and relationships, personal and cultural expression, orientation in time and space, scientific and technical innovation, globalization and sustainability, fairness and development

Key Concepts:
Form, relationships, logic

IB Aims:

The aims of MYP mathematics are to encourage and enable students to:

  • enjoy mathematics, develop curiosity and begin to appreciate its elegance and power
  • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics
  • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts
  • develop logical, critical and creative thinking
  • develop confidence, perseverance, and independence in mathematical thinking and problem-solving
  • develop powers of generalization and abstraction
  • apply and transfer skills to a wide range of real-life situations, other areas of knowledge and future developments
  • appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other
  • appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the work of mathematicians and the applications of mathematics
  • appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives
  • appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other areas of knowledge
  • develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to pursue further studies in mathematics
  • develop the ability to reflect critically upon their own work and the work of others.

IB Objectives:
Knowing and understanding, investigating patterns, communicating, applying mathematics in real-world contexts

Prior to 2014:

Human Ingenuity: Problem-based explorations, drawing and understanding diagrams, using measurement instruments

Environments: Using data from other aspects of the school environments to create informative diagrams

Community and Service: Presenting data to school community

Performing Arts Year 1

Overview:
Year 1: Music Theory emphasizes music literacy through note-reading, rhythm, ear training, and written exercises designed to build the student’s understanding of how written notation works. With a growing understanding of the mechanics of music, students will become careful and knowledgeable listeners ready to explore the effect music has on culture, and vice versa. Students are asked to demonstrate their knowledge of rhythm, pitch, and notation using written responses to musical selections.

Year 1: Instrumental Music emphasizes individual skills and learning to play in time as part of an ensemble. Students are graded solely upon improvement, effort, and personal involvement with the goal of encouraging a love of music while providing opportunities for each student to improve his or her skill level in accordance with his or her interests. It is a creative, fluid curriculum that depends upon constant assessment and reassessment of the students, their abilities, and interests.

Year 1: Chorus (Introductory) emphasizes vocal technique and mechanics, including posture, breathing, and vocal placement. Students listen to and sing a variety of musical genres, discussing the characteristics of each. Armed with the vocabulary to compare musical styles each student is prepared to explore the genesis of his or her individual musical taste. With that understanding students are encouraged to expand their library of preferred music, and gain a lifelong method of creative artistic expression.

Topics Covered:
Origins and elements of music; music history, vocal technique, and mechanics; emotional expression, and skill development

Global Context:
Identities and relationships, personal and cultural expression, orientation in time and space

Formative Assessment:
Ongoing assessment and adjustment, on group and individual levels, of performing arts skills through class effort, homework, oral games, written and/or oral reflections, music journaling, performance

Summative Assessment:
Performance assessments, analysis, reflection

Approaches To Learning:
(ATL’s): Music journaling, knowledge acquisition through reading, listening, recording, discussing, doing, and reflecting communication, social, self management, thinking

IB MYP Year 1 Aims and Objectives:

At the end of the year 1, students should be able to:

  • demonstrate an awareness of the art form studied in relation to some of the contexts that influence their current work;
  • use some basic language, and have a simple understanding of some of the concepts and processes that support their current work;
  • learn skills and develop the techniques and processes needed to create, perform and/or present art, with the teacher’s guidance;
  • identify strengths and weaknesses in their work;
    receive feedback constructively;
  • demonstrate curiosity, self-motivation, initiative and a willingness to take informed risks;
  • recognize that art practices and artworks vary from culture to culture;
  • understand how the arts play a role in developing and expressing personal and cultural identities;
  • become informed and reflective practitioners of the arts;
  • experience the process of making art in a variety of situations;
  • explore, express and communicate ideas;
  • appreciate lifelong learning and enjoyment of the arts.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service
: Cultural celebrations and performing arts help build community

Human Ingenuity: Understanding that artistic techniques broaden creative opportunities

Environments: Performing arts affect the classroom, school. local, and even national environments

Health & Social Education: Singing, playing, or moving to a beat promotes physical/mental wellbeing

Performing Arts Year 2

Overview:

Year 2: Instrumental Music concentrates upon the individual’s function as part of a group. Students learn how to lead, follow, negotiate differences of opinion, and cooperate. Personal involvement with the goal of encouraging a love of music is a must, while providing opportunities for each student to improve his or her skill level in accordance with personal interests. It is a creative, fluid curriculum that depends upon constant assessment and reassessment of the students, their abilities, and interests.

Year 2: Drama focuses upon script and character analysis while encouraging effort and personal involvement. The content of the curriculum changes from year to year in accordance with the needs of students. Recognizing that adolescents need to test boundaries and take risks in order to grow our drama program allows students to try on different personalities, behaviors, and thought processes in an entirely safe environment, offering the opportunity for students to internalize some of life’s lessons without suffering the real-life consequences.

Year 2: Chorus focuses on sight-reading and musical theory and further develops techniques introduced in Year 1. Students have begun to appreciate a wider variety of musical styles and actively search out novel vocal experiences becoming open-minded risk takers. Student are graded on the basis of improvement, effort, and personal involvement.

Global Context:
Identities and relationships, orientation in time and space, personal and cultural expression

Topics Covered:
The individual’s effect upon the group, expression of character through drama, taking musical and vocal risks, vocal change and stages of development, stages of plot development, premise, conflict

Formative Assessment:
Continual assessment and adjustment, on group and individual levels, of performing arts skills through class effort, homework, oral games, written and/or oral reflections, music journaling, and performance

Summative Assessment:
Performance assessments, analysis, myth adaptation, play writing, reflections

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Communication, social, self management, research, thinking

IB MYP Year 2 Aims and Objectives:

At the end of year 2, students should be able to:

  • developed an awareness of the art form studied in relation to some of the contexts that influence their current work;
    use basic language, and have an understanding of the concepts and processes that support their current work;
  • develop skills and develop the techniques and processes needed to create, perform and/or present art, with the teacher’s guidance;identify strengths and weaknesses in their work;
  • receive feedback constructively;
  • develop curiosity, self-motivation, initiative and a willingness to take informed risks;
  • understand that art practices and artworks vary from culture to culture;
  • understand how the arts play a role in developing and expressing personal and cultural identities;
  • become informed and reflective practitioners of the arts;
  • experience the process of making art in a variety of situations;
  • explore, express, and communicate ideas;
  • appreciate lifelong learning in and enjoyment of the arts.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Service helps build community

Human Ingenuity: Music helps the individual find expression

Environments: Environments are created through Drama

Health & Social Education: Expressing emotions artistically promotes physical/mental wellbeing

Performing Arts Year 3

Overview:
Year 3: Drama Students are practicing a variety of intermediate acting exercises designed to improve physical awareness, improvisation, timing, and commitment to motivation. Movement studies include Bogart and Landau’s Viewpoints and Le Coq’s Neutral Mask. These studies are crucial to the process of physically interpreting a character for the stage; what type of knowledge one needs, and what kind of observations are necessary to bring a character to life. Students have also been exploring group movement in a variety of different activities designed to boost coordination, body awareness, and communication. Throughout the course of the year, students will perform Shakespearean monologues and modern monologues in practical application of these developing skills.

Year 3: Instrumental Music Students, while still honing their ensemble skills, come to a deeper understanding of the individual’s influence the success of a community and how the structural integrity of a system is often interdependent upon its parts. Year 3 students also prepare for additional public concerts throughout the year. Students are graded solely upon improvement, effort, and personal involvement with the goal of encouraging a love of music while providing opportunities for each student to improve his or her skill level in accordance with his or her interests. It is a creative, fluid curriculum that depends upon constant assessment and reassessment of the students, their abilities, and interests.

Year 3: Chorus Students building upon concepts introduced in Year 1 and 2 take leadership roles in a the large multi-grade setting. Students come to a deeper understanding of the individual’s influence the success of a community and how the structural integrity of a system is often interdependent upon its parts. Students are graded on the basis of improvement, effort, and personal involvement.

Topics Covered:
Music & cultural identity, the individual’s effect upon the group; leadership in the arts, movement in situational context, personal and cultural expression, spacial relationships on stage

Formative Assessment:
Continual assessment and adjustment, on group and individual levels, of performing arts skills through class effort, homework, oral games, reflections written and/or oral, and performance

Summative Assessment:
Performance assessment, composition, peer assessment, reflections

Global Contexts:
Identities and relationships, orientation in time and space

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Communication, social, self-management, research, thinking

IB MYP Year 3 Aims and Objectives:

At the end of the course students should be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a variety of styles, developments and ideas which have shaped the arts across time and cultures;
  • apply appropriate terminology to show aesthetic and critical awareness;
  • experiment and explore through both spontaneous and structured activities;
  • use art confidently as a form of expression and communication while demonstrating a range of technical skills;
  • apply skills specific to the art forms studied to elaborate an idea, a theme or composition to a point of realization;
  • present work through formal or informal performance and exhibition;
  • reflect upon and evaluate their work in order to set goals for future development;
  • assess and appraise their work and that of others;
  • show sensitivity to their own and different cultures;
  • accept and incorporate views and feedback from others to further develop their artistic potential;
  • show initiative, creativity, and a willingness to take risks;
  • support and encourage their peers towards a positive working environment;
  • understand how the arts play a role in developing and expressing personal and cultural identities;
  • appreciate how the arts innovate and communicate across time and culture;
  • become informed and reflective practitioners of the arts;
  • explore, express and communicate ideas;
  • become more effective learners, inquirers and thinkers;
  • appreciate lifelong learning in and enjoyment of the arts.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Using music to serve the greater good

Human Ingenuity: Performing arts offer a variety of ways to express ideals, emotions, and insights

Environments: Music and dramatic arts create a variety of environments

Health & Social Education: Singing, playing, or moving to a beat promotes physical/mental wellbeing

Physical Education Year 1

Course Description

Overview:
Physical education encourages skill acquisition, training, fitness, sportsmanship and individual performance. Each student is expected to cooperate and encourage others to participate at the highest level of his/her ability.

The Year 1 athletic program provides an opportunity for students to participate in an extensive interscholastic sports program, promote basic skill development, develop team concepts, and understand team strategies, experience lifetime leisure activities, as well as building self-confidence

An all school Field Day is planned each spring to celebrate student growth, development, teamwork, and sportsmanship.

Topics Covered:
Soccer, cross country running, field hockey, flag football, floor hockey, speedball, ultimate frisbee, basketball, volleyball, jump rope for heart, partner balance, team handball, tennis, capture the flag, group fitness, presidential physical fitness test, kickball, and pillow polo

Formative Assessment:
Examinations, narrative writing assignments

Summative Assessment:
Performance assessment

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s
:
Communication skills
Exchanging thoughts, messages and information effectively through interaction
Interpret and use effectively modes of non-verbal communication

Social:
Collaboration skills
Working effectively with others

Self Management:
Organization skills
Managing time and tasks effectively

Affective skills:
Managing state of mind
Perseverance, self-motivation, and resilience

Reflection skills:
(Re-)considering the process of learning; choosing and using ATL skills
Consider content- What did I learn about today? What don’t I understand yet? What questions do I have now?

Thinking:
Critical thinking skills
Analyzing and evaluating issues and ideas

Creative thinking skills
Generating novel ideas and considering new perspectives
Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products or processes

Global Context:
Orientation in time and space

Key Concepts:
Change, communication, relationships

IB MYP Year 1 Aims and Objectives:
Participate effectively in a variety of contexts, understand the value of physical activity, collaborate and communicate effectively

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Emphasis of team as a community

Human Ingenuity: Reflect on consequences of human actions and choices

Environments: Recognizing safe practices within the environment

Health & Social Education: Group work and physical activity; Understanding effects of physical training on the body

Physical Education Year 2

Course Description

Overview:
The Year 2 physical education develops skill acquisition, training, fitness, sportsmanship, and individual performance. Each student is expected to cooperate and encourage others to participate at the highest level of his/her ability.

The Year 2 athletic program provides an opportunity for students to participate in an extensive interscholastic sports program, enhance basic skill development, apply team concepts and understand team strategies, experience lifetime leisure activities, as well as building self-confidence

An all school Field Day is planned each spring to celebrate student growth, development, teamwork, and sportsmanship.

Topics Covered:
Soccer, cross country running, field hockey, flag football, floor hockey, speedball, ultimate frisbee, basketball, volleyball, jump rope for heart, partner balance, team handball, tennis, capture the flag, group fitness, presidential physical fitness test, kickball, and pillow polo

Formative Assessment:
Examinations, narrative writing assignments

Summative Assessment:
Performance assessments

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s
:

Communication skills
Exchanging thoughts, messages and information
Give and receive meaningful feedback
Interpret and use effectively modes of non-verbal communication

Social:
Collaboration skills
Working effectively with others

Self Management:
Organization skills
Managing time and tasks effectively

Affective skills:
Managing state of mind
Perseverance, self-motivation, and resilience

Reflection skills:
(Re-)considering the process of learning; choosing and using ATL skills
Consider content- What did I learn about today? What don’t I understand yet? What questions do I have now?

Thinking:
Critical thinking skills
Analyzing and evaluating issues and ideas

Transfer skills
Utilizing skills and knowledge in multiple contexts

Global Context:
Personal and cultural expression

Key Concepts:
Change, communication, relationships

IB MYP Year 2 Aims and Objectives:
Participate effectively in a variety of contexts, understand the value of physical activity, collaborate and communicate effectively

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Fundraising for American Heart Association

Human Ingenuity: Multiple personalities impact play

Environments: Team systems impact play

Health & Social Education: Ready, Set, Jump – lifetime physical fitness

Physical Education Year 3

Course Description

Overview:
In Year 3 physical education skill acquisition, training, fitness, sportsmanship and individual performance are understood. Each student is expected to cooperate and encourage others to participate at the highest level of his/her ability. The Year 3 athletic program provides an opportunity for students to participate in an extensive interscholastic sports program at the advanced Grade 7 – 8 level, enhanced skill development and team strategies are expected. Being a risk taker, as well as self-confident is encouraged.

Students have firmly developed an appreciation and understanding for the value of physical education and its relationship to a healthy, balanced lifestyle.

An all school Field Day is planned each spring to celebrate student growth, development, teamwork, and sportsmanship.

Topics Covered:
Soccer, cross country running, field hockey, flag football, floor hockey, speedball, ultimate frisbee, basketball, volleyball,jump rope for heart, partner balance, team handball, tennis, capture the flag, group fitness, presidential physical fitness test, kickball, and pillow polo

Formative Assessment:
Examinations, narrative writing assignments

Summative Assessment:
Performance assessments

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s
:

Communication skills
Exchanging thoughts, messages and information
Give and receive meaningful feedback

Social:
Collaboration skills
Working effectively with others

Self Management:
Organization skills
Managing time and tasks effectively

Affective skills:
Managing state of mind
Perseverance, self-motivation, and resilience, mindfulness

Reflection skills:
(Re-)considering the process of learning; choosing and using ATL skills
Consider content- What did I learn about today? What don’t I understand yet? What questions do I have now?

Thinking:
Critical thinking skills
Analyzing and evaluating issues and ideas

Transfer skills
Utilizing skills and knowledge in multiple contexts

Global Context:
Identities and relationships

Key Concepts: Change, communication, relationships

IB MYP Year 3 Aims and Objectives:
Participate effectively in a variety of contexts, understand the value of physical activity, collaborate and communicate effectively

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Positive team-building

Human Ingenuity: American Heart Association applying research

Environments: Understand safe practices for environments

Health & Social Education: Demonstrate interest in the promotion of health and wellness

Physical Science Year 3

Course Description

Textbook: Interactive Science: Introduction to Chemistry. Pearson Education, Inc. 2014; Interactive Science: Forces and Energy. Pearson Education, Inc. 2014; Interactive Science: Sound and Light. Pearson Education, Inc. 2014

Science Explorer: Electricity and Magnetism. Prentice Hall. 2005

Additional Resource:Science Explorer: Chemical Building Blocks. Prentice Hall. 2005

Overview:
The Science curriculum at St. James Academy is delivered in two basic formats; lecture and experimentation using multi-sensory learning approaches. Success at varying ability levels encourages positive attitudes and interest toward science. Science experiences are designed to increase awareness of self and surroundings through a discovery approach.
Students work in cooperative groups to model real life scientific experiences that are activity, inquiry, and project based to solve problems, promote interaction, and develop collaborative skills. By encouraging exploration and open-ended investigation, students enrich their research skills, problem-solving, critical thinking, and decision-making, while covering grade level content and concept. Integration of IB MYP philosophy enhances global awareness, community, caring, environmental responsibility, and encourages a belief in the relevance of scientific study to daily life.

Topics Covered:
Matter, motion, force, work and machines, energy, electromagnatism, STD’s

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, oral games, written and/or oral reflections, experiments, exit tickets, drills, lab work.

Summative Assessment:
Unit tests, mid-term and final exams, MYP projects

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Note taking, knowledge acquisition skills, application of knowledge, analyzing skills, observation skills, communication skills, integrating and summarizing skills, scientific inquiry skills, hypothesizing, evaluation skills, collaboration, integrity, responsibility, and reflection

Global Context:
Globalization and sustainability, scientific and technical innovation

IB MYP Year 3 Aims and Objectives:
At the end of the Year 3, students should be able to:

  • give examples of science and scientific applications and discuss some of their positive and/or negative effects on people, societies and the environment;
  • understand and use scientific language relevant to the units of work covered;
  • use appropriate information and communication technology applications (World Wide Web, data loggers, databases, spreadsheets and/or software for plotting graphs) to access, process and communicate scientific information;
  • draw conclusions supported by explanations that are consistent with analysis of data;
  • describe and explain ways in which science is applied and used to solve local and global problems;
  • organize and transform data into numerical and diagrammatic forms, including mathematical calculations and visual representation (tables, graphs and charts);
  • demonstrate understanding of basic scientific language by using appropriate scientific terminology, units of measurement and symbolic representation;
  • provide scientific information using appropriate modes of communication: oral, written, visual representation (formulae, graphs, tables, diagrams);
  • work effectively as members of a team, by collaborating, acknowledging, and supporting others as well as ensuring a safe working environment;
  • show respect for themselves and others, and deal responsibly with the living and non-living environment;
  • develop inquiring minds and curiosity about science and the natural world;
  • acquire knowledge, conceptual understanding and skills to solve problems and make informed decisions in scientific and other contexts;
  • formulate an hypothesis and explain it using logical scientific reasoning;
  • design scientific investigations that include variables and controls, material/equipment needed, a method to be followed, data to be collected and suggestions for its analysis;
  • appreciate the benefits and limitations of science and its application in technological developments.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Project based – Growing bay grasses and replanting in the Bay; organizing individual and group responses to community needs

Human Ingenuity: Appreciate the nature of scientific inquiry and real life scientific endeavor; Electricity use and evaluation of its social and ethical impact

Environments: One World Our Earth; Analyzing concepts, principles, and issues related to sustainability

Health & Social Education: Brain involvement and drugs: developing public service announcement educating others on the affects of drugs

Pre-Algebra Year 2

Course Description

Textbook: Prealgebra, Sadler, Oxford, Glencoe and ALEKS – online course

Overview:
This Year 2 Pre-Algebra course engages students in the exploration of number patterns, orders of operation, algebraic expressions and equations. Students are introduced to modeling of integers and solving multi-step equations. This course allows students to explore number theory including whole number factoring, exponents, and scientific notation. Students explore rational numbers, and the relationship between fractions, decimals, and percents. Finally, students use proportionsand percents to solve problems. More formal study of relationships found in geometry and probablility are explored. IB MYP projects are continually evolving as we make connections and integrate with additional subject areas.

Topics Covered:
Functions, real numbers, rational numbers, algebraic expressions, solving linear equations, graphing equations, graphing linear equations, writing linear equations, inequalities, geometry and measurement, and probability

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, quizzes, reflection written and/or oral, journaling, graphing

Summative Assessment:
Unit Tests, mid-term and final exams, MYP projects

ATL’s: Knowledge acquisition, critical thinking skills, communication skills, collaborative skills, note taking, recognizing concepts and applying skills, using a calculator, using appropriate technology skills, developing and applying problem-solving strategies, approximating data, diagramming, organizing data

Human Ingenuity: Exploring the application of mathematical knowledge

Environments: Population growth / resources

Community & Service: Apply different forms of representation (graphs, tables, and diagrams) to communicate facts and figures to the school community

Health & Social Education: Informed, responsible choices, and positive attitudes lead to balanced and healthy lives for themselves and other members of their community

Mathematics, MYP Year 2, Aims and Objectives:
At the end of Year 2, students should be able to demonstrate basic knowledge and understanding of the following branches of mathematics: • number • algebra • geometry • statistics and probability • discrete mathematics by being able to:
• know and demonstrate understanding of some of the basic concepts of number, algebra, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics;
• use concept-specific strategies to solve simple problems in both familiar and unfamiliar situations including those in real-life contexts;
• apply basic rules correctly to solve simple problems including those in real-life contexts;
• apply basic inquiry and mathematical problem-solving techniques, with guidance from the teacher, by identifying variables, posing relevant questions, organizing data and using an appropriate model;
• recognize simple patterns similar to previously seen examples;
• describe simple patterns in words and/or diagrams;
• arrive at a result or set of results and make predictions based on extending the pattern(s);
• describe simple mathematical relationships;
• use appropriate mathematical language (notation, symbols, terminology) in both oral and written communications, with guidance from the teacher;
• use different forms of mathematical representation (simple formulae, diagrams, tables, charts, graphs and models);
• state, in writing and/or verbally, the steps followed in solving simple problems;
• consider the reasonableness of their results in the context of the problem;
• consider the importance of their findings, with guidance from the teacher;
• describe simple patterns as relationships or general rules;
• arrive at a single result or set of results and make predictions consistent with findings.

Design/Technology Year 1

Course Description

Overview:
In this Year I Technology and Design course students are introduced and begin to explore applications and their functions. This knowledge provides the tools for decision making when students become involved in projects. Students will then have a basis for determining which application will best meet his/her needs when developing a specific project. Technology is used as a tool to enhance student efficiency by investigating, planning, creating, and evaluating information.

Topics Covered:
Accessing reliable and appropriate resources, collecting data, organizing information, analyzing data, creating excel worksheets, creating iMovies, desktop publishing

Formative Assessment:
Class work, technological resource evaluation, written and/or oral reflections

Summative Assessment:
MYP projects using the IB Design Cycle

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s
: Note taking; Developing organizational, communication, and time management skills; Learn and apply new skills, apply ICT effectively to access, process, and communicate

Global Context:
Globalization/sustainability, fairness and development, scientific and technical innovation, personal and cultural expression, orientation in space and time, identities and relationships

IB MYP Year 1 Aims and Objectives
At the end of Year 1 students should be able to:

  • consider the problem within a wider context;
  • ask useful questions about the investigation;
  • with guidance, use different systematic methods to collect and select information, and to organize it logically;
  • describe, with guidance, the steps needed to create the product/solution;
  • construct a plan to create, with guidance, the product/solution that makes effective use of resources and time;
  • understand the importance of plans and, with guidance, follow the plan to produce the product/solution;
  • create, with some guidance, a product/solution of appropriate quality;
  • consider, with guidance, the impact of the product/solution on individuals and/or on society;
  • explain, with guidance, how the product/solution could be improved;
  • identify and describe the parts they found easy and the parts that proved difficult;
  • with guidance, suggest ways in which their performance could be improved;
  • provide evidence of personal engagement with the subject (motivation, independence, general positive attitude) when working in technology;
  • develop an appreciation of the significance of technology for life, society and the environment;
  • use knowledge, skills, and techniques to create products/solutions of appropriate quality;
  • develop respect for others’ viewpoints and appreciate alternative solutions to problems.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: When making transitions, support from others may make the road less bumpy

Human Ingenuity: Statistics influence our actions

Environments: Technology and our environments; individual actions impact the quality of our environments

Health & Social Education: Investigate and analyze time management behaviors to provide for a more productive and healthy lifestyle

Design/Technology Year 2

Course Description

In this Year 2 Technology course students build on Year 1 skills and extend their knowledge of the use of technology tools to more effectively communicate information. These skills are used to communicate tasks to robots to accomplish goals and solve problems. Students will design, build, and manufacture systems to aid the global community. Students also will reflect on their personality traits as they relate to career choices, marketability, and future job trends. Students are also asked to periodically reflect and document their works from other disciplines as they align with the IB learner profile.

Topics Covered:
Robotics, programming, entrepreneurialism, engineering, design and manufacturing, marketing, data collection, project planning and collaboration, web design, career exploration

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, written and/or oral reflections

Summative Assessment:
MYP projects using the IB Design Cycle

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s
: Developing organizational skills, communication, time management skills; learn and apply new skills, apply ICT effectively to access, process, and communicate

Global Context:
Scientific and technical innovation, fairness and development

Key Concepts:
Communication, communities, development, systems. logic, creativity

Related Concepts:
Adaptation, innovation, collaboration, invention, function

IB MYP Year 2 Aims and Objectives
At the end of Year 2, students should be able to:

  • consider the problem within a wider context;
  • use different systematic methods to collect and select information, and to organize it logically;
  • describe, the steps needed to create the product/solution;
  • construct a plan to design, plan, and create, with guidance, the product/solution that makes effective use of resources and time;
  • understand the importance of investigation and planning and follows the plan to produce the product/solution;
  • create and evaluate a product/solution of appropriate quality;
  • consider the impact of the product/solution on individuals and/or on society;
  • explain how the product/solution could be improved;
  • provide evidence of personal engagement with the subject (motivation, independence, general positive attitude) when working in technology;
  • develop an appreciation of the significance of technology for life, society, and the environment;
  • use knowledge, skills, and techniques to create products/solutions of appropriate quality;
  • continue to develop respect for others’ viewpoints and appreciate alternative solutions to problems.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Every individual can bring about change, which creates a ripple effect

Human Ingenuity: Overcoming challenges in order to learn and apply new skills

Environments: Communication and emergency preparedness can effect survival

Health & Social Education: Career exploration offers a variety of options

Design/ Technology Year 3

Overview:
Students apply Year 1 and Year 2 skills to implement the Design Cycle to increase their knowledge and awareness of a specific global topic. An independent research project on a self selected topic allows students to investigate a question as they move through the components of the cycle. Information and communication technologies are emphasized to increase awareness and perspective of the world in which the students live. A community project will enhance this research with service learning and a presentation.

Topics Covered:
Information literacy, organizing information, communicating effectively; applying MLA Format; reflecting on the research and communication process; community service

Formative Assessment:
Class work, homework, written and oral reflections

Summative Assessment:
MYP community project using the IB Design Cycle

Approaches to Learning:
ATL’s: Research, note taking; developing organizational, communication, and time management skills; learn and applying new skills; applying ICT effectively to access, process, and communicate information

Global Context:
Identities and relationships, scientific and technical innovation

Key Concepts:
Communication, communities, and development

Related Concepts:
Innovation, collaboration, evaluation

IB MYP Year 3 Aims and Objectives
At the end of Year 3, students should be able to:
• formulate and discuss appropriate questions that guide the investigation;
• identify and acknowledge a range of appropriate sources of information;
• collect, analyze, select, organize, and evaluate information;
• evaluate the sources of information;
• construct a plan to create and implement the product that has a series of logical steps;
• follow the plan to produce the product;
• explain how the product could be improved;
• carry out units of work in technology using materials safely and responsibly;
• provide evidence of personal engagement with the subject.

Prior to 2014:

Community & Service: Technology as a means to communicate

Human Ingenuity: Exploration of materials that can be used to build an instrument

Environments: Information and knowledge impact the environment

Health & Social Education: The world does not have an unending supply of food